Dachshund Dog Breed Breed (History, Grooming, Cost + Lifespan)

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Dachshund Dog Breed Breed (History, Grooming, Cost + Lifespan)

Everything You Need to Know About Dachshund Dog Breed

 

 

Before you adopt a Dachshund puppy, you should understand the behavior of the breed. If you are not aware of its behavior, you might run into behavioral issues later on.

Dachshund behavior is quite different from other dog breeds. Read on to discover more information.

You can also read up on Shih Tzu dog breed grooming tips to make your pet look its best! But before you adopt a puppy, it’s best to understand the Dachshund dog breed’s temperament and personality.

 

Dachshund Dog Breed History

The Dachshund dog breed has a long history that can be traced back to the fifteenth century in medieval Europe. The dogs were originally bred for hunting badgers.

The Germans brought the dogs to Germany, where they underwent selective breeding over a hundred-year period. The result was the Dachshund we know today.

Although its name reflects its long and lean body, it isn’t the only important aspect of the Dachshund dog breed history.

The breed was originally bred for hunting because it had long legs that helped it tunnel into badger burrows.

Its long tail extended straight from its spine, and its paddle-shaped paws were perfect for digging efficiently. Its soft skin allowed it to move easily through small caves and did not tear easily.

Its long, deep chest allowed the dog to hunt badgers and other small mammals, while its large, pointed nose helped it sniff out their prey and chase them down.

The Dachshund is also known as the sausage dog and wiener dog. Despite their popularity, they can be a delightful member of the family.

In the early 1950s, this small breed of dog was at the top of the most popular dog lists. This breed has numerous loving names, such as dachshund, wiener dog, hot dog, Dashie, Teckels Dachels, and terrier.

Dachshund Dog Breed Temperament and Personality

A recent study on the temperament of Dachshund dogs revealed that these dogs are more likely to bite their owners and strangers than any other breed. This may sound like a bad thing, but this small dog breed is not without its faults.

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For example, a Dachshund may become aggressive if it senses another dog, or may bite a human without even realizing it. This behavior is also common among smaller breeds, and is often unreported.

Originally, dachshunds were used as hunting dogs. They would burrow into their dens, flush out their prey, and fight to the death.

While dachshunds were bred for hunting, they became popular as family dogs,

eventually winning the hearts of American citizens and royalty.

Queen Victoria was a fan of dachshunds, and the breed was introduced in the United States in the late 19th century.

Even today, they are regarded as a direct representation of German culture. In fact, dachshunds are still used for hunting in Europe.

 

Facts about Dachshund Dog Breed

Known by many different names, the Dachshund is a hound-type dog breed. These dogs can have long, smooth, or wire-haired coats. Dachshunds are also known as sausage dogs, wiener dogs, and badger dogs.

If you’re looking for a dog to add to your family, this is the dog breed for you. Facts about the Dachshund dog breed include:

Queen Victoria is said to have loved dachshunds and famously said, “Nothing turns a man’s house into a castle faster than a Dachshund.” Picasso’s beloved dog Lump ruled his house, even eating at the dinner table.

The dog was featured in many of the artist’s works, including his version of Las Meninas. The Dachshund’s long ears are a great help to pick up scents.

Originally bred as hunting dogs, the Dachshund was a fierce hunter. It burrowed into burrows and chased badgers. These dogs would fight until they died.

Today, these dogs are lap dogs instead of Lancelot, though their stubbornness and bravery have been retained.

If you’re looking for a dog to cuddle, consider a Dachshund.

 

How much does Dachshund Dog Puppy Cost

Buying a puppy will require you to pay high prices for its necessities. Dachshunds are among the most popular dogs, and you may want to consider a used pup if possible.

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However, if you’re willing to travel, you can look for a puppy in a shelter or rescue center. Veterinary care will also be a big cost when you buy a Dachshund, and you should be prepared to pay up to $500 for these services.

The cost of a Dachshund puppy depends on many factors. It can range anywhere from $300 to $3500, with the lowest costs being from adoption.

On the other hand, you can purchase a Doxie from a registered breeder for a higher price. Registered breeders invest in the health of their puppies, and this is reflected in the price.

You should also factor in annual vet care, which can range from $100 to $300. This can include vaccines, heartworm prevention, and exam fees.

 

Dachshund Dog Breed health, lifespan and diet

A healthy diet is vital to the longevity of any dog, and the Dachshund is no exception. The Dachshund is among the top ten longest living dog breeds in the world, but that longevity can be extended with the right diet and exercise routine.

When purchasing a puppy, make sure the breeder knows all about the health of the parents of the dog. In addition, find out about the health history of the breeder, as this is critical for proper care and the best dog food.

The average lifespan of a dachshund is twelve to fifteen years. While this figure can vary, some owners have reported their dog living as long as seventeen or eighteen years.

Although longevity is highly dependent on genetics, proper care and diet can prolong a dog’s life and provide a high level of happiness. Proper care can also help to extend a Dachshund’s lifespan, even if it is only twelve to fifteen years.

 

Dachshund Dog Breed with other pets

If you plan to keep a Dachshund as a companion, consider a few important considerations to ensure its health and longevity. Dachshunds are prone to back injuries and excessive weight gain. Their name translates to “Badger Hound” in German.

In fact, this dog breed was originally bred from the Pointer and Pinscher dog breeds to hunt badgers and other small prey.

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The Dachshund Dog Breed is a loyal companion who gets along with other pets and children. However, its long back makes it prone to disk problems and may not be suitable for households with small children.

Dachshunds originated in Germany centuries ago and were bred to hunt badgers. Today, the Dachshund breed is a popular household pet in North America. In Europe, dachshunds are still used for hunting.

The Dachshund dog breed has three main types: Smooth, Wirehaired and Longhaired. The Wirehaired Dachshund is the largest of the three. It is also known as a “Tweener,” which is in between Standard and Miniature.

The Wirehaired Dachshund has a terrier in its lineage. The longhaired Dachshund has a middle personality.

 

Questions to Ask before getting Dachshund Dog

If you’re considering adopting a Dachshund as a pet, it is important to know the breed’s health and behavioral issues.

Although dachshunds are popular companion dogs and family dogs, they do have some health concerns. Before getting a dachshund, be sure to discuss these issues with your veterinarian. Listed below are some questions to ask before getting a Dachshund dog.

 

Are You Prepared for the Dachshund’s unique personality?

  • Dachshunds are a pack-oriented breed of canine.
  • They thrive in families and are protective and loyal to their owners. They may be a little difficult to train but can be a joy to have as a pet.
  • Ask your vet about training your Dachshund.
  • If you’ve always wanted a dachshund, be sure to ask your vet about the breed’s personality.
  • A reputable breeder will be willing to answer any questions you have and make sure you trust them.
  • Make sure to check the kennel’s reputation and if the owner is a member of the Kennel Club or a similar scheme.

Also, check if the breeder is listed on your local Kennel Club website as a Breeder of Merit or Bred With HEARTH programme.

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

 

 

We hope you enjoyed this article… What are your thoughts?

 

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